Torn Paper Art and Writing Lesson for Elementary School

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torn paper art lesson

Objective: To inspire children’s writing through the use of textured torn paper and collage

Age: 6+

Time: 30-45 minutes (writing varies) Grades: 1st +

Materials:

Lesson for Torn Paper Art

1. Allow your students to choose the topic they want to create. For this example, you will see an example of a winter themed snowman and a snail in the grass.
2. Choose the color paper you want as a background.
3. Choose the different color paper you want to use to create your picture.
4. Tear the colors slowly into various shapes to represent the topic/ setting or habitat.
5. Glue pieces into place carefully.

Note: If you tear paper quickly and narrowly, you will enable the paper to curl. Allow them to practice if needed. Remember, no scissors! Continue reading



How to Host a Literacy Night for Physical Education

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literacy night physical education

A Literacy Night is a great way to show how integrating literacy through physical activity is simple and can improve reading and writing abilities. You can work with classroom teachers, the PTO, and the community to put this event together. Here are a few physical activity ideas to include in the event to support your school’s efforts.

Yoga Cards

This company called the Alphabet Workout has a number of free and affordable activities that focus on teaching phonics and letters to young children struggling to learn this topic. One great activity to get exercise and improve the basics of reading at the same time is yoga. In this activity, a set of cards with letters on them correspond to different yoga poses. Each card has a picture of a child doing the pose on the front along with a short story about the pose on the back of the card for the teacher to read. Older students can read the story themselves as well as do the poses independently. Learn more about the benefits and how to incorporate yoga into your classroom. Continue reading



Student Learning in Physical Education: The Minimum Six

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Article by George Graham, Co-founder of PE Central 

PE Minimum Six

Overview

My grandkids have learned to read. They enjoy trying to solve math problems. But when I ask them what they have learned in physical education their answers are opaque. Mostly they tell me what they are doing in P.E.

In this short piece, I am suggesting that physical education teachers, and programs, should be able to describe at least some of what their students have actually learned in their classes. And the kids they are teaching should be able to show you what they have learned.

Physical education programs have a wide variability in the time allotted for classes, from a few days a year, to daily. Classes are also taught by specialists who have majored in physical education, and also by coaches and fitness specialists and classroom teachers. Continue reading



How to Know If Your School Is Eligible for Grants

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grant schools

Is Your School Eligible for Grants?

It might seem that all schools should be equally eligible for grants if they truly have a need for the grant money. That is simply not the case. Two types of organizations are eligible for the most grants.  They are public schools and non-profit, 501(c)(3) organizations.  The next two types of organizations in line for grant eligibility are private schools and other types of non-profit organizations. By far the least eligible for grants are for-profit schools or organizations of any type.

Many public schools truly do not have the money to operate as they should, especially if they have large populations of at-risk students from low-income families.  To be able to fund critical technology upgrades, adequate reading programs, and arts programs slashed by budget cuts, they require grant money. Continue reading



Bucket Stilts Relay & Thornbush Madness – PE Activities for K-2

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k-2 PE activities

PE Teacher Drew Burris shares 2 activities he uses with his K-2 grade classes to build skills like balancing, hand eye coordination, locomotor movement, and pathways and directions

Activity 1: Bucket Stilts Relay

Skills: Balancing & Hand Eye Coordination

Equipment:

For my K-2 students, I always want to try and see how their balance is. There are many ways I can test this, but the bucket stilts are the best. Hand-eye coordination as well as balancing are crucial for this activity.

I usually split the group into 8 sections, 4 at half-court, and 4 on the other side of the gym. The more groups you have the less waiting there is. Students are to walk to the group in front of them, and then hand the stilts off. It can be a challenge to get on them sometimes, but their partner behind them can help them out. To make it a little bit more challenging, I will add some noodles on the floor to have students work with pathways on how to get around the object or over. We call them logs. Students love the stilts once they get the hang of it. I have incorporated them into stations, if we do that for P.E. that day. Continue reading



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