PE Teachers – Professional Development & Continuing Education

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Professional Development at PE Central for PE Teachers!

Our friends over at PE Central continue to do amazing things for the Physical Education community!  I have had the honor of working on a few projects with Mark Manross from PE Central, and with each project I grow more respect and adoration for PE Teachers and their passion for what they do.

PE Central Online Professional Development School 

My favorite project thus far has been working with Mark to develop PE Central’s online school that features professional development opportunities for PE Teachers. I was so surprised when I read surveys from hundreds of Physical Education Teachers that expressed the lack of continuing education and professional development out there available to them. Teachers are being required to complete multiple hours of professional development credits and CEUs every year, yet many feel they are not receiving valuable knowledge or tools to implement in their classrooms. Mark and his team wanted to change that for the PE Community.

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5 School Program New Year Resolution Ideas

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The New Year is a great time to think about your hopes and goals for the upcoming year. While making personal goals is also important, don’t count out making New Year Resolutions for your program or classroom as well. Making your goal attainable is the secret to making it a success. Here are 5 cool (and attainable) resolutions for you to consider for the New Year.

1. Start a Student Group

Empowering students and teaching them leadership and management skills is priceless. Although we are not the experts in doing this, we know someone who has had great success, and we were lucky enough to have her share her experience, tips and struggles in her Guide to Leading Enthusiastic Student Groups.

school program ideas

2. Adopt a Community Cause

Whether it is visiting with a local nursing home, sprucing up an area of your local park, or raising money for a shelter. Find something that students are excited to help with and work together as a team to support that cause. Work with other classrooms and programs to get them on board as well.

3. Bring Brain Breaks & Activity into Your Program/Classroom

There are many studies and even national programs like Let’s Move! Active Schools that stand behind the notion that Active Kids Do Better! So adding small doses of planned exercise into the day will not only benefit the children in your class, but also you in the long run. If you are a teacher, include a brain break every hour. Run an after school program? Start the afternoon off with a 15 minute active exercise, then include brain breaks every 25-30 minutes.

Here are some great ways to get started bringing activity into your classroom:

·  Let’s Move! Active Schools rewards schools for enrolling (it’s free) and actively participating in their program as champions at your school. Find out if your school or a partnering school to your program is involved.

·  Get going with these awesome PE Central Cooperative Skills 

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Staying Current and Energized as a Physical Educator

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North Park PE

Let me first start by saying that after you have taught elementary PE for more than thirty years, there is a chance that your body will start to react somewhat like the character of the Tin Man in the story of The Wizard of Oz. My joints fit the part without a doubt. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not that I can’t get moving. I just seems often that I need a little “oil” to loosen up the joints as I begin my day. Usually I accomplish this by working out at my local fitness club so that by the time I am dressed for school I am ready to go!

Most days I laugh about this Tin Man analogy and other days I spend some time reflecting on it. Just because I have been teaching for “ages”, and my body reminds me of that fact by not always being able to complete the physical tasks of the job with the same grace and ease that I did in my twenties and thirties, does that mean my mind and teaching ability need to automatically follow suit? That is to say just because my body acts “old” some days, do I have to teach in an “old” or “ancient” way to match?

While it is certainly true that everyone is different, we probably all know a Physical Education Teacher or two who would fit the age/teaching ability correlation. Anyone who knows me well knows that I do not accept the notion that physical age equates to “job age”. In fact, I might even argue that Continue reading



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