How to Host a Literacy Night for Physical Education

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literacy night physical education

A Literacy Night is a great way to show how integrating literacy through physical activity is simple and can improve reading and writing abilities. You can work with classroom teachers, the PTO, and the community to put this event together. Here are a few physical activity ideas to include in the event to support your school’s efforts.

Yoga Cards

This company called the Alphabet Workout has a number of free and affordable activities that focus on teaching phonics and letters to young children struggling to learn this topic. One great activity to get exercise and improve the basics of reading at the same time is yoga. In this activity, a set of cards with letters on them correspond to different yoga poses. Each card has a picture of a child doing the pose on the front along with a short story about the pose on the back of the card for the teacher to read. Older students can read the story themselves as well as do the poses independently. Learn more about the benefits and how to incorporate yoga into your classroom. Continue reading



Top 3 Literacy Support Materials for the Classroom

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classroom literacyBuilding strong literacy and language skills is so important. They are what forms the basis for learning in all subjects. With effective instruction and literacy development in early childhood education classrooms, teachers and educators can have a substantial impact on these skills.

With many schools and districts focused on increasing literacy skills right now, we turned to our friends at Steps To Literacy to help us gather the best support tools to help you. Steps to Literacy specializes in curating customized classroom libraries based on reading levels, genres, topics and specific students’ needs. The expertise they have developed from providing thousands of teachers with literacy solutions has led them to develop some exclusive support materials for the classroom. Back in July, S&S brought on a handful of our favorites. We are excited to take a closer look at them below and share with you how you can use them in your classroom. Continue reading



Classroom Book Activity – How Rocket Learned to Read

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book activity

Classroom Book Activities for: How Rocket Learned to Read by Tad Hills

Story Summary

In this wonderful story about words and reading, a little yellow bird teaches a dog named Rocket the alphabet. Soon he discovers the joy of using letters to make words and reading stories all by himself!

Recommended Ages: Grades 1 – 2

Activity 1

  • Gather the class on the rug to introduce How Rocket Learned to Read. As a whole class do a picture walk of the story. The teacher can model how to do a picture walk or students can volunteer to say what they notice about the pictures.
  • During the picture walk, introduce new vocabulary such as marvel and captivated. Write the new words on chart paper.
  • After the picture walk, read the story to the class.

Materials

Continue reading



How to Use Storytelling Yoga in the Classroom

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classroom storytelling yogaIf you have an extra 15 minutes you can accomplish three things in your classroom:

  • Calm yourself and your students
  • Engage them in a story
  • Become more physically fit

You can accomplish all of this through Storytelling Yoga. It combines two popular yet age old activities; storytelling and yoga. The benefits of both activities alone are incredible, but when combined, you will likely engage more students than you normally would using only one of the two. This appeals to visual learners, audio learners and kinesthetic learners. Continue reading



Integrating Literacy Into Physical Education

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literacy physical educationIt is everyone’s job, including PE teachers, to prepare students with the skills to succeed in today’s job market. Aside from math, literacy is the most fundamental skill any student needs to succeed in a global economy.

Common Core – The Future of PE

As times have changed, so too has the role of physical educators. My first physical education teaching job was in a very old and small Catholic private school. The school was virtually on an island surrounded by three streets and a shopping center—and there was no gym.  All I had to work with was a parking lot with a backdrop of a major discount thrift store and a small room with a big pole in the middle of it.  If a soccer ball was kicked too hard, it would wind up in the street.  To say it was ideal is a misnomer.

I had been hired to replace the teacher who founded the physical education course at the school. The teacher was a bit old school. She recommended I do games like push cans with sticks to build fine motor skills. The equipment was severely lacking of anything modern.  My primary focus at the time was to modernize the program and teach sport skills. Fast forward to today and it is no longer just enough to teach sport skills.  It is no longer enough to focus on physical skills alone.  The new expectation, outside of a lifetime fitness-based approach to a physical education program, is the integration of common core subject areas into PE. Continue reading