Annual Back to School Drive – Jewish Family Services

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back to school

Volunteers who sorted and stuffed hundreds of school supplies for those in need

All of us here at S&S Worldwide were proud to support and sponsor the Jewish Family Services 3rd Annual Back to School Drive.

Benefitting Greater Hartford Families & JFS Clients in Need

It’s hard to believe August has come to an end, the last month of summer, and the new school year will officially begin soon and has already started for many schools. With that comes the hustle and bustle of getting our children ready for the start of school. As a mother of three daughters ages 11, 9 and 4, I know firsthand how busy and stressful this time can be for families. However, imagine the added pressure of not having the resources to purchase new school supplies for your children. Unfortunately, this is the case for many families in our community.

This past month, I was proud to co-chair the Jewish Family Services (JFS) Third Annual Back to School Drive, which benefitted low-income children throughout Greater Hartford. In partnership with the Mandell JCC’s Family Room and PJ Library of Greater Hartford, the goal of the Back to School Drive is to prepare children with the tools they need to feel organized, self-confident and motivated to succeed in the classroom. Continue reading



Tissue Paper Art & Writing Activity for Elementary School

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tissue paper classroom

Objective: To enhance children’s visual art and writing through the use of tissue paper

Age: 5+

Time: 30-45 minutes (writing varies)

Grades: Kindergarten +

Materials:

Lesson for Tissue Paper Activity

1. Select the size, color, and type of paper you will want to glue tissue paper on. We used construction paper. Continue reading



Back to School Activity Ideas for Seniors and Grandkids

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back to school seniors grandkids

For this back-to-school season, consider planning a special intergenerational event to unite your residents with their school-aged grandkids. Here are a few ideas from notjustbingo.com for you to choose from.

1. Kindergarten Skills Training

Get the kindergarteners ready for school by hosting different types of activities in which residents can teach the kids new skills. For instance, provide toy airplane kits for the kids to improve their motor skills, use team play wrist links for kids to better their social skills, or have the residents call a fun game of Simon Says for kids to improve their listening skills.

2. Milk and Cookies Break

Recruit your facility’s Baking Club to bake an array of different cookies as you invite the grandkids to stop by for a fun afternoon. Set out the cookies, along with regular, chocolate, and strawberry milk – and don’t forget the fun, colorful straws. Continue reading



Watercolor Resist Art with Writing Lesson for Students

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Objective: To visually inspire writing through textured resist art mediums

Age: 5+

Time: 30-45 minutes (writing varies)

Grades: Kindergarten +

Materials:

 

Lesson for Crayon & Glue Resist Art

  1. Choose a topic to illustrate using masking tape or liquid glue.
  2. Choose the desired size of paper. Lighter shades will allow the ‘resist’ to appear easily.

Continue reading



Getting the Grant – How to Strengthen Your Grant Proposal

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grants proposal

Strengthening Your Grant Proposal – Emulate Successful Programs

The grant proposals with the greatest chance of being funded are the ones the grant readers believe have the best chance of being successfully implemented. In other words, if you are able to convince those reading and evaluating your grant proposal that you will actually be successful in correcting the problems you address in the proposal, you are much more likely to be awarded the grant money.

Any grant program is essentially a change program. There are two ways to increase the likelihood of success in any change program. The first is to copy a program that is already successful as closely as possible. The second is to pilot a small change program of your own first and then seek grant money to expand it based on the success you achieved in your pilot program. When I was principal of a middle school in Northeast Texas, we were able to capture grant money in both ways. We copied what neighboring schools were doing successfully, and we also set up successful pilot programs that we later expanded with grant money.

If you are going to write a grant based on the success of another school, it is important that you have similar populations and similar problems to overcome. It doesn’t help to say you are going to improve your reading scores just like an adjacent school when that school’s students were one grade level behind in math and yours are two grade levels behind in reading, and that school has 20% at-risk students when you have 60%. The problems don’t match, and the student populations don’t match. A grant reader would have no reason to believe you would achieve similar success.

Continue reading



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